Carbondale's community supported, weekly newspaper

Pages of the Past: Highways, sidewalks and burning planes

Sections: News Published

From the archives of the Roaring Fork Valley Journal, compiled by Will Grandbois

March 31, 1977

Colorado Highway Department district engineer Richard Prosence told the Journal that he was asking for $1 million to expand parts of Highway 82 to four lanes. The project was waiting on an environmental assessment by the federal government. There were also some concerns about proposed routes that might potentially wipe out the El Jebel ranch house, the Mather Building at Emma and the old Harris stage road near Basalt.

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“The last time we had situations like these… it took 14 months to get it cleared through Washington,” Prosence said.

April 2, 1987

The Town of Basalt commended those who had rescued a man from his burning aircraft when it crashed in Holland Hills two weeks before.

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“Let it be known to everyone that’s what saved my life,” Federal Express pilot Greg Dunham reportedly told Police Chief Larry Johnson when the idea of special recognition was proposed.

In the presentation, Johnson noted that he had seen many people turn a blind eye rather than risk their own safety under such circumstances, but that the collective act of heroism had reinvigorated his faith in humanity.

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April 3, 1997

Carbondale’s Gordon Cooper Branch Library entered the internet age with access to MARMOT, an online database of collections around the country. The system had already been well received in New Castle, and with numerous other libraries on the Western Slope using it, the move was anticipated to greatly increase the interlibrary loan rate. Ech branch started with two computer terminals, but had the option of adding more for $2,500 each.

April 5, 2007

A series of improvements were planned to create safer routes to school for local kids. New paths were proposed along Capitol Avenue, Eighth Street, Snowmass Avenue, and Highway 133. At the time, walking and biking to school had declined to about 10 or 15 percent of students nationally, compared to 60 or 70 percent for their parents.

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