The Sopris Sun

Pages Past: An exciting history of parking and taxes

From the archives of the Roaring Fork Valley Journal

Aug. 11, 1977

In the style of the Civilian Conservation Corps of the Great Depression, The Youth Conservation Corps was putting local teens to work over the summer in an effort to combat some of the highest unemployment rates in years. Locally, the eight-week paid gig involved helping the U.S. Forest Service. Over the course of the summer, they restored the Lily Lake ranger station, work on the fish breeding ponds on Kline Creek, did winter range improvement for elk, constructed the parking lot at the Thomas Lakes trailhead and build a bridge across Hell Roaring Creek.

In other news… El Jebel was anticipating its first full service bar-restaurant in the form of the “Cedar Inn,” opening in September.

Aug. 13, 1987

A “tough, brutal” year for the coal industry left Mid-Continent Resources up for auction for unpaid property taxes — and not for the first time. The only metallurgical grade coal mine still operating in the state, Mid-Continent had been struggling since the previous year, when the USC steel plant in Utah was closed due to a strike and never reopened. Since then, miners that hadn’t been laid off had taken a 21 percent pay cut. The school and fire districts, to whom most of the $384,384 delinquency was owed, were also anticipating tighter budgets.

In other news… A meeting was scheduled to discuss the possibility of pursuing a “Wild and Scenic” designation for the Crystal River (an effort that is still underway).

Aug. 14, 1997

Carbondale’s Ben Franklin 5-and-Dime was planning to shutter in October shortly after the expansion of City Market into its Crystal Plaza space pushed it into a new building. The corporation to which the franchise belonged had already filed for bankruptcy, and some said the closure was just a sign of the changing times.

In other news… The Unnamed Carbondale Community Bike Program gave bike sharing a try with donated bikes, with their low value as the only theft deterrent.

Aug. 16, 2007

A parking crunch in downtown and lack of enforcement on a 2-hour time limit had trustees looking for solutions. Potential solutions considered included meters, deputizing a retiree to act as a parking monitor or encouraging more walking and biking. “The only thing I can guarantee for certain is that it’s only going to get worse,” Mayor Michael Hassig said. (Currently, downtown parking is mostly provided by leasing lots from private owners — not owned by the town itself.)

In other news… The new Roaring Fork High School building was preparing to welcome students on schedule, with an open house scheduled after the first day of school.