Carbondale's community supported, weekly newspaper

Pages of the Past: ‘To the kids of Carbondale’

Sections: News Published

From the archives of the Roaring Fork Valley Journal

Dec. 22, 1978

Well before his own stint as a trustee, sculptor John Hoffman presented the town with a gift in the form of “Unckle Henry,” a life sized man constructed of railroad spikes bearing the inscription, “To the kids of Carbondale.” It still sits in a section of the Garfield Avenue right-of-way near Sopris Park.

  • 2020_eyecare thumbnail

In other news… The Town was looking at ways to cover unemployment insurance, which municipalities would be subject to at the start of the new year.

Dec. 23, 1987

Counselor Holly Hehir was exploring some radical ideas about drug and alcohol treatments. On the addiction side, she viewed dealing with the whole emotional, spiritual, mental and physical spectrum as the best way to avoid recidivism. Treatments included body work, acupuncture and other techniques pulled from both Western and Eastern philosophy. Her holistic suggestions also noted a good sweat at the Vapor Caves as a hangover cure. But, the headline observed, “hair of the dog still works.”

  • FSM_SoprisSun_Saul thumbnail

In other news… The Bureau of Land Management was considering Wilderness Study Area designation for Eagle Mountain, Hack Lake, Bull Gulch and Castle Peak.

Dec. 24, 1997

Garfield County agreed to contribute $25,000 a year for three years toward the construction of a new Colorado Animal Rescue shelter. That brought CARE up to about $300,000 and near its fundraising goal, although the site was beginning to look more expensive than previously thought. Meanwhile, Sheriff Tom Dalessandri asserted the need for a dedicated officer if the County decided to reinstate animal control, but Commissioner John Martin felt it would have to be handled with existing staff.

  • Basalt Library thumbnail

In other news… The Roaring Fork Valley was in the process of getting a Habitat for Humanity chapter — which was already expected to look very different from its equivalents in non-resort markets.