• BUSINESS COSTS Proposed redevelopment of the Sopris Shopping Center would add 76 new rental units to Carbondale's housing inventory – 15 being deed-restricted and 64 “efficiency” apartments, measuring 415 to 725 square feet. Meanwhile, nine locally-owned businesses see themselves displaced, mid-pandemic. More on page 8. Photo by Raleigh Burleigh. BUSINESS COSTS Proposed redevelopment of the Sopris Shopping Center would add 76 new rental units to Carbondale's housing inventory – 15 being deed-restricted and 64 “efficiency” apartments, measuring 415 to 725 square feet. Meanwhile, nine locally-owned businesses see themselves displaced, mid-pandemic. More on page 8. Photo by Raleigh Burleigh. Current Issue→ Past Issues
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Business as unusual

Locations: News Published

Ever-changing regulations have left shops, restaurants and other services scrambling. Some, like Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli, just pulled up stakes, while the Pour House has opted to just close for the duration. Among the rest, here are a few that stood out in their attempts to keep the door’s open, if only figuratively.

  • The Beat scrapped its restaurant service for the time being to operate as a pick-up and delivery grocer — with a few housemade options.
  • The Crystal Theatre continues to offer concessions to go with your at-home movie experience.
  • Dos Gringos Burritos offered car-side pickup on rollerskates during the initial closures.
  • Habitat for Humanity’s Restore put its inventory online for virtual browsing.
  • The Hotel Denver provided free housing to evacuees from the Grizzly Creek Fire.
  • The Near New took limited hours and volunteers as an excuse to be open on Saturdays for the first time.
  • The Post Independent reduced its distribution to three days a week, while the Roaring Fork Weekly Journal closed up shop.
  • Slow Groovin’ BBQ brought its food truck down to the former Red Rock Diner until renovations were complete and it reopened as Honey Butter.
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