Stuff by Whitney Will

  • Locations: Opinion Published

    Sun Signs: An impending Mars retrograde

    At 4:22 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 9, Mars will come to an apparent halt and begin retrograde motion. 

    For just over nine weeks, Mars will appear to move backward in the sky, before stationing again on Nov. 13 and renewing forward motion. Mars is the finalread more →

  • Locations: Columns Published

    Sun Signs: Saturn enters Aquarius

    On March 21, Saturn will ingress into the sign of Aquarius, marking the end of one mini-epoch and our collective entrance into another. 

    Saturn has been in the sign of Capricorn since December 2017, bringing attention to the structure of our institutions and “the establishment.” Saturn’sread more →

  • Locations: Opinion Published

    Sun Signs: Anatomy of a Retrograde

    By now, most people have heard of Mercury retrograde.

    It is one facet of astrology that has made its way into the mainstream. Mercury retrograde is known for complicating travel plans, confusing communication, messing up technology, and eliciting all sorts of frustrating shenanigans when you areread more →

  • Locations: Columns Published

    Sun Signs: Uranus in Taurus, Mars retrograde

    Two events dominate the astrological stage this summer. One, which began in mid-May but will be in effect until 2026, is Uranus’ ingress into Taurus. The other is Mars’ imminent retrograde in Aquarius. Today we stand ankle deep in one, at the precipice of the other.

    read more →

  • Locations: Columns Published

    Sun Signs: Capricorn cornucopia

    There’s big energy on the move. In mid-March, Mars ingresses into Capricorn, joining Saturn in the Goat’s sign. The copresence of these two planets in this sign will not go unnoticed, and Mars’ two-month transit will only invigorate the already heavy tenor.

    Capricorn is anread more →

  • Locations: Columns Published

    Eclipses, dually noded: The first entry in a new astrology column

    The much-talked-about “super blue blood moon” is now two weeks behind us, its appearance heralded in the first eclipse of 2018. Feb. 15’s partial solar eclipse, though only visible in Argentina and parts of Antarctica, signals the close of eclipse season.
    Eclipse season comes twice a year, roughly… read more →