Archive

  • Sections: Columns Published

    Covert Critique: A linear society in a circular universe

    Round and round and round we go. Are we spiraling up or are we spiraling down? Like everything the answer comes in perspective. It is time to bring some perspective to the centerpiece of Carbondale, the roundabout, or rotary as our friends from across the pond call it. In our typically linear society what better way for The Covert Critic to start their first column then to circle back around to the circuitous traffic interchange that’s got us spinning counter-clockwise (also perspective dependent). read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Five Laws of Fish: A poetic response to the 2017 Five Point Film Festival

    First Law of Fish Fish in the river shall remain in the river unless acted upon by an outside force. Force of nature. Failure of dam. Flood. Famine. Kingfishers. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    New science for a new future of food

    We are in the midst of a global food supply “predicament” due to the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Very conservative research shows yield declines of up to 19 percent by midcentury and 63 percent by the end of the century in the Midwest. And this doesn’t take into account the collapse of yields in other areas of the world upon which we are now dependent, because in Colorado we only source a mere 1% of our food supply locally. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Seeking Higher Ground: In search of a Golden Rule

    When the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported on the probable impact of the first TrumpCare bill, I wrote this rant: “What the CBO measures is dollars. What it doesn’t measure is human misery: The leading cause of bankruptcy in this country is medical debt. The most contentious marital issue is money. Divorces rise in times of financial distress, and divorce, in turn, is the greatest cause of financial distress among women, especially those with children. Suicide rates rise at times of recession and depression, measured all the way back into the 1930’s. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Lost in translation (en español, también)

    Public schools are public resources. They’re our schools. Every voice in our school community deserves to be heard and understood. That doesn’t mean we’re all going to agree with every decision each administrator makes, but it does mean we can’t give up on sharing our views, working to understand views different from our own, and stepping up to support our schools. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Why CRES was the obvious choice

    I was at my third-grader’s school, Crystal River Elementary School, in an after-school art class watching children apply glaze to ceramic bowls. One student was using the “splatter” technique, and the glaze sprayed anyone who was standing nearby. My maroon dress had just been adorned with a new pattern: small aqua dots of pottery glaze. It was messy, beautiful and funny all at once. My friend, Maria, looked at my dress and laughed. I wracked my brain trying to remember the Spanish word for “clean” or “wash” so I could ask: Do you know if it will wash out? read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Don't walk out, waffle in

    To the greatest, most wonderful community in the world, The world of public education is difficult, but I believe that the model we have at Roaring Fork High School represents the best of what it can be: student-centered, character-driven, authentically rigorous and focused on opportunities for all. It is and has been the professional honor of my life to serve in a school like this where students are kind and know that they can change the world. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Protect open space and ‘messy vitality’

    Finally, past the musical chairs of elections and Stacy’s lamented move up the Crystal, Carbondale is settled in with a well-qualified, dynamic, and level-headed board of trustees for the next year at least. I can’t think of a better moment to tackle some tough issues. The toughest issues facing this board are intertwined and familiar: growth, affordable housing and community character. Let’s start, roughly, with growth. It’s happening fast. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Geeking out over astronauts and art

    Any space geeks out there? As an independent artist and illustrator (living and working here in Carbondale) I find the subject of space fascinating. I suppose I “geek out” on it occasionally through my artwork since astronauts, constellations, and rockets make semi-frequent appearances in my paintings. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Seeking Higher Ground: Mending fences versus building walls

    Last week, lured by abnormally-early spring weather, I started repairing the stone walls that enclose my raised garden beds. This spring task was memorialized by Robert Frost in “Mending Wall,” a poem that talks about two neighbors rebuilding the wall between their farms. read more →