Archive

  • Sections: Columns Published

    Lost in translation (en español, también)

    Public schools are public resources. They’re our schools. Every voice in our school community deserves to be heard and understood. That doesn’t mean we’re all going to agree with every decision each administrator makes, but it does mean we can’t give up on sharing our views, working to understand views different from our own, and stepping up to support our schools. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Why CRES was the obvious choice

    I was at my third-grader’s school, Crystal River Elementary School, in an after-school art class watching children apply glaze to ceramic bowls. One student was using the “splatter” technique, and the glaze sprayed anyone who was standing nearby. My maroon dress had just been adorned with a new pattern: small aqua dots of pottery glaze. It was messy, beautiful and funny all at once. My friend, Maria, looked at my dress and laughed. I wracked my brain trying to remember the Spanish word for “clean” or “wash” so I could ask: Do you know if it will wash out? read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Don't walk out, waffle in

    To the greatest, most wonderful community in the world, The world of public education is difficult, but I believe that the model we have at Roaring Fork High School represents the best of what it can be: student-centered, character-driven, authentically rigorous and focused on opportunities for all. It is and has been the professional honor of my life to serve in a school like this where students are kind and know that they can change the world. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Protect open space and ‘messy vitality’

    Finally, past the musical chairs of elections and Stacy’s lamented move up the Crystal, Carbondale is settled in with a well-qualified, dynamic, and level-headed board of trustees for the next year at least. I can’t think of a better moment to tackle some tough issues. The toughest issues facing this board are intertwined and familiar: growth, affordable housing and community character. Let’s start, roughly, with growth. It’s happening fast. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Geeking out over astronauts and art

    Any space geeks out there? As an independent artist and illustrator (living and working here in Carbondale) I find the subject of space fascinating. I suppose I “geek out” on it occasionally through my artwork since astronauts, constellations, and rockets make semi-frequent appearances in my paintings. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Seeking Higher Ground: Mending fences versus building walls

    Last week, lured by abnormally-early spring weather, I started repairing the stone walls that enclose my raised garden beds. This spring task was memorialized by Robert Frost in “Mending Wall,” a poem that talks about two neighbors rebuilding the wall between their farms. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Chicago Cubs fan in Carbondale

    Spring training is here and I can finally get into my favorite sport. That’s right, you pigskinheads. This is one Coloradan who loves baseball and doesn’t care much for football. What’s more, I’m a life-long, die-hard, true-blue Cub fan, 2016 was the best year of my life, and I’m so looking forward to 2017. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    P's & Q's: Name the frightening futuristic tale

    All right, since no one’s gonna come right out and say it, I will; Trump has a bromance with Putin. I believe Rosneft (Russia’s state oil company) sold 20% to the Trump Organization on the condition that sanctions would be taken care of. Soon. And then Flynn took the fall for the whole deal. What a Moe. Is it pretty much understood that Moe is the dumbest stooge? read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    ‘Misery makes strange bedfellows’: The magically contemporary message of ‘The Tempest’

    At the Thunder River Theatre Company (TRTC), “The Tempest” begins with a roar and a crash. While Prospero, played by Jeff Carlson, magically conjures up a storm, Prospero’s ocean-tossed enemies are disgorged from the bowels of the theatre itself, appearing through a trap door. As they writhe and struggle to hang onto their sinking ship, cries ring down from dark catwalks encompassing the ceiling. Thunder crashes from all sides, the darkened theatre rumbling and shaking the audience. read more →
  • Sections: Columns Published

    Seeking Higher Ground: Of painting, pikas and politics

    Right now, I’m pursuing two long-deferred callings: writing a personal column and becoming a fine-art painter. Those two activities feel like yin and yang, emotionally balancing the scales: painting is a right-brain activity, writing is left-brain. When I’m writing, my mind is full of words. I never miss a publication deadline. While I’m painting, mind chatter disappears. I lose track of time. I sometimes even miss meals. read more →