Archive

  • Sections: News Published

    Renee Maggert benefit slated

    Renee Maggert, a 27-year resident of Carbondale, first started noticing symptoms at least two years ago: fatigue when hiking or rafting, not as strong as in the past, weight loss and more. Today, she suffers from double vision and cannot drive; she has also moved in with friends because she often chokes when eating or swallowing; if her weight drops to 88 pounds she’ll have to use a feeding tube. Maggert’s COBRA insurance expired recently and she faces mountains of medical bills. To help her out, friends have organized a sweetheart dinner and dance at the Orchard from 6 to 10 p.m. on Feb. 14 (see the ad on page five for details). Kim Velasquez, who is helping to organize the event, said her kids went to school with Maggert’s. They and a few others were always at Roaring Fork High School serving and preparing food for sports teams. “But Renee was the person the coaches and teachers would call. If they needed someone to organize and get the job done, she was always eager to help,” Velasquez said. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    C&RFPD faces challenges, bikers face education push

    This is the second in a two-part Q&A article on the state of Carbondale. It leads off with questions for the Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District) read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    Arizona poets to lead Youth Poetry Slam at PAC3

    If you missed the memorable poetry slams at Steve’s Guitars and Roaring Fork High School last year, take heart. The spoken-word artists who led those events are returning to the Roaring Fork Valley and will be sharing their verbal magic in the schools, on stage, and even a few times on the KDNK airwaves from Feb. 3-14. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    “Way-finding” finds it’s way into Carbondale’s lexicon

    On Jan. 27, two dozen Carbondale residents huddled around two oversized town plats, marking the town’s artistic and cultural resources. Stars and arrows quickly blossomed all over the maps, indicating music venues, theatres, gardens, architect offices, artists and crafts workers, galleries and restaurants. The occasion was a creative-zone meeting entitled “Way-Finding and Connectivity,” sponsored by the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities (CCAH). As explained by CCAH Executive Director Amy Kimberly, the meeting was a “brainstorming session to map Carbondale’s creative resources,” and part of a process that will include applying for a grant from the state of Colorado in May. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    Carbondale officials dealing with major issues in 2014

    SUN: What’s up with the Unified Development Code (drafting a new zoning code). JANET BUCK (planning director): “We’re going full tilt into the code rewrite. You’ll see slow times and times for public comment and review. People really need to keep track of what’s going on. They can go to the UDC website (http://carbondaleudc.com/) and sign up for updates.” STACEY BERNOT (mayor): “The consultant we’re using has initiated a great Internet interface that allows people to provide their feedback. The idea is to update our land use code that’s over 30 years old, and have it dovetail nicely with our newly approved comprehensive plan. Our hope is to have it streamlined and user friendly, so that it not only reflects what the community wants but everyone knows the lay of the land before they get in there.” read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    Trustees vote for compromise on CR106 request

    On Tuesday night, after extensive public input and some deliberation, the Carbondale Board of Trustees opted for a compromise in their recommendation to Garfield County on Colorado Rocky Mountain School’s application for the county to vacate the part of County Road 106 that runs through the school campus. The motion for a compromise was made by trustee Frosty Merriott, then seconded and heavily modified by trustee Allyn Harvey. The motion, which the trustees approved 4-1, states that the right-of-way should only be vacated if pedestrian access is allowed to continue through the school, or an alternative path is created along the eastern boundary of the school’s property. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    CRMS request on CR106 lights Satank’s fuse

    It might be just outside city limits, but a recent request for Garfield County to vacate a section of County Road 106 is quickly becoming another Carbondale controversy. On one side is Colorado Rocky Mountain School (CRMS), an institution that has coexisted with the town since 1953. On the other is unincorporated Satank, once a competitor for the railroad stopover and now a ’Bonedale neighborhood in all but the legal sense. Between CRMS and Satank is a little less than a quarter mile of County Road 106, which runs through the school campus before intersecting with Dolores Way. CRMS wants that section of County Road 106 vacated, while many Satankers and residents along Dolores Way want Garfield County to keep it on the books. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    MRI still working on solid waste transfer approvals

    It’s been more than a year since the Garfield County commissioners approved an application for a waste transfer station on County Road 100 east of Carbondale, and little if anything seems to have happened at the proposed site. But Don Van Devander, general manager for waste-hauler Mountain Rolloffs Inc., told The Sopris Sun the company is slowly chipping away at the multitude of tasks that must precede the new trash-sorting complex. The transfer station should take shape this year on the former Mid-Continent Resources coal load-out property. read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    C’dale celebrates installation of three solar arrays

    On Jan. 15, Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot untied the ribbon on an array of 356 solar panels that are now powering the town’s Roaring Fork water treatment facility. “It goes towards Carbondale’s ongoing goals for green energy and offsetting our use,” Bernot said in a press release. “What more appropriate place than our nature park for a living example of what we hope to achieve? This array will offset 100 percent of our historic energy use at this water plant.” read more →
  • Sections: News Published

    Meeker calls for troops, peace is averted

    The year is 1879 and Indian agent Nathan Meeker, a renowned national authority on agriculture, is becoming frustrated by the slowing progress of the civilizing of the Indians. The volunteer Ute plowmen and ditch diggers that Chief Douglas (Quinkent) had organized were not showing up, so Meeker requested a budget from Gov. Pitkin to hire white people to plow up the winter range of the Nünt’z at a faster rate. Gov. Pitkin had campaigned with the slogan “the Ute’s must go!” and the money to hire white workers came quickly. Meeker had given a few of the chiefs land parcels on a surveyed grid for a town he had laid out on their winter range. This was to entice them to cooperate and now he was plowing that up in an effort to consolidate the fencing necessary to keep Indian horses out of the irrigated fields. Meeker even plowed up the racetrack where horses raced during the great Bear Dance gathering in the spring. read more →